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to the phone hacking scandal by closing down britain's best-selling sunday newspaper. but the investigation continues, with reports that a former editor and adviser to the british prime minister is to be arrested. dozens are killed in days of violent clashes between rival political groups in the pakistan city of karachi. and a final flight for the u.s. space shuttle atlantis. it prepares for its final journey to the stars. this is newsday. >> hello and welcome. it is the phone hacking scandal which has stunned britain. today came the biggest bombshell of all. britain's best-selling newspaper, "news of the world," is being shut down. the closure comes after a public outcry, but it has not lifted the spotlight from the murdoch empire, which controls 40% of circulation in the u.k. and has worldwide reach. >> rupert murdoch, 1969, shortly after he bought a newspaper that was to become his very profitable pride and joy. >> 4 give the individual by all means, but you cannot forget. >> 42 years later, he might well have made the same remarks about the news at the paper that became thoroughly rotte
by closing down britain's best-selling sunday newspaper. the investigation continues with your porch with former adviser to the prime minister. >> dozens are killed in days of violent clashes in the pakistani city of karachi. >> and special atlantis prepares for its last journey to the stars. >> it is 9:00 a.m. in singapore. >> and it is to a.m. here in london. this is newsday. >> hello and welcome paired it is the phone hacking scandal that has stunned britain and today came the biggest bombshell of all. britain's best-selling sunday newspaper "the news of the world" is being shut down by murdoch's news international. the closure comes after a public outcry. but it has not lifted the spot line of the murdoch empire which controls 40% of newspaper circulations in the u.k. and has worldwide reach. the bbc business editor robert preston starts our coverage. >> rupert murdoch, 1969, shortly after he bought a newspaper which was to become his very profitable pride and joy. >> 4 give the individual, by all means. but you cannot forget. >> he may have well have made the remarks about the n
this to american news -- newspapers. but in britain, he apologized to the british public for the hacking scandal. the real question is what will be amended in a select committee today on questions on whether or not there was a cover-up. this has shaken many of the foundations of the british political scale. >> four decades, -- for decades, rupert murdoch has towered over britain's. but what will remain of him? has this shifted the balance between politicians and media in britain? >> the relationship became too close. we all want the support of newspaper groups and broadcasting organizations. do we spend enough time asking questions how these organizations are regulated? there is a new chance to do that. that is what we are born to do today. >> a spotlight a listing on the relationship between the british and the media elite. politicians in the former leaders are distancing themselves from news corp.. >> the politicians are pleased about that. >> as the murdoch's in a prepared for the committee, some believe it is a moment for catharsis for politicians. will the day-to-day dealings with politicia
may have been less than truthful when he testified tuesday before a parliamentary committee in britain. now the justice department in this country is investigating whether the murdoch empire broke the law. that's ahead. woman: saving for our child's college fund was getting expensive. man: yes it was. so to save some money, we taught our 5 year old how to dunk. woman: scholarship! woman: honey go get him. anncr: there's an easier way to save. get online. go to get a quote. 15 minutes could save you 15% or more on car insurance. to your kids' wet skin. new neutrogena® wet skin kids. ordinary sunblock drips and whitens. neutrogena® wet skin cuts through water. forms a broad spectrum barrier for full strength sun protection. wet skin. neutrogena®. >>> there have been members of congress in the united states who have asked us to investigate those same allegations and we are progressing in that regard using the appropriate federal law enforcement agencies in the united states. >> welcome back to "hardball." that was attorney general eric holder exactly a week ago admitting th
. >>> after weeks of controversy, resignation and arrests, britain's "news of the world" published its last issue yesterday, sunday. the final issue of the british tabloid reading, thank you and good-bye. it comes as explosive new allegations come to light about the phone-hacking scandal surrounding the paper. the rival "the mirror" reports today a new york city reports "news of the world" asked for voice mail of 9/11 victims. the report says the tabloid wanted phone numbers and details of calls leading up to the terror attacks almost a decade ago. nbc's anabel reports on the demise. >> reporter: rupert murdoch arrived in london to oversee the crisis threatening his media empire in britain. on the road to his headquarters he enjoyed one last read of the newspaper he closed down last week. "thank you and good-bye" screamed the front page. it was britain's biggest selling paper with an unbeaten record for exposing corruption but the tables have turned and it is now being investigated following allegations of police bribery and widespread hacking of personal voice mails. few of the current sta
committee in britain. now the justice department in this country is investigating whether the murdoch empire broke the law. that's ahead. you're watching "hardball" only on msnbc. [ male announcer ] if it's true that sharks can sense even a drop of blood from a quarter of a mile away, which razor would you use? ♪ ♪ ♪ can be even more powerful, with precise pain relieving cream. it blocks pain signals fast for relief precisely where you need it most. precise. only from the makers of tylenol. a network of possibilities. in here, the planned combination of at&t and t-mobile would deliver our next generation mobile broadband experience to 55 million more americans, many in small towns and rural communities, giving them a new choice. we'll deliver better service, with thousands of new cell sites... for greater access to all the things you want, whenever you want them. it's the at&t network... and what's possible in here is almost impossible to say. so delicious. i think you'll find it's the vegetables. deliciously rich. flavorful! [ female announcer ] together at last. introducing new stouf
publication, britain's news of the world is rocked by a major scandal over hacking phone messages, forcing the closure of that paper. arrests of deplayers, a high level resignation and allout attack against newscorp and the murdoch's family. >> and tell what yous they're doing. >> seems to break all the rules. >> are you telling me the people who work in that organization in this country have never ever used the same tactics? >> the hacking scandal tagged to several levels of the british government forcing parliament to investigate the accusation and calling rupert and james murdoch to set the record straight. >> they have no right to break the law if they're an american corporation. back here, politicians and the liberal press push for investigations into newscorp's u.s. operations trying to tie them to the news of the world scandal. what's behind this effort? >> that was then. >> despite administration denials, evidence emerges proving an anti-fox bias inside the white house. >> the politicians in the white house are willing to look you right in the eye and lie to you. >> jon: the end of
culture in britain. there is no evidence the "new york post" published stories similar to those published in "news of the world" or "the sun." it does at the least raise questions about the journalism here. >> in other news, security forces in syria have shot at least 20 protesters across the country. throughout the day, thousands of people staged some of the biggest protests so far against the rule of president asisad. roughly 1400 civilians have died since the uprising began in march. in egypt, thousands rallied in the two largest cities. five months after president mubarak was removed from power, they are becoming impatient with the interim military rulers. they are demanding that police officers accused of killing protesters during the uprising be put on trial. in libya, the fighting continues. the main opposition group was given a diplomatic boost today. the united states and other nations have recognized it as the governing authority in the country. the announcement came from istanbul where secretary of state hillary clinton is meeting with other members of the group. for more on th
war when britain's survival was in the balance. out in the atlantic, the convoy brought essential supplies, the food without which the population would stop, the munitions without which the war werwould collapse. there were sunk by german ships. nazi germany was in danger of winning. britain desperately needed a break through to survive. it happen here in secluded countryside 40 miles north of london. this is quiet and rather overlooked now, but, 70 years ago, these prefabricated huts were part of one of britain's most secret and model assumptions. it was here that britain broke the codes of the german military. the most brilliant mathematician, crosscourt experts, and linguists were brought together to tackle the intercepted messages of this, the supposedly impenetrable german cipher machine called enigma. the british built this, called colossus. this is a replica of it. it is generally considered to be the world's first computer. with its coats, which had taken codebreakers six days to crack by hand, it could now be crack in a matter of hours. >> we would have lost a war. it is
an appeal at against extradition from britain to sweden. he is accused of sexual offenses. his lawyers told the high court in london that the description of the charges were misleading and unfair. he denies any wrongdoing. still to come on the program, more on the u.k. phone-hacking scandal, what it means for media relationships around the world. >> breyer earth elements are crucial, but to controls the lion's share of production? police and guatemalans have arrested two men in the collection of argentine singer. he was one of the most respected folk singers. his car was ambushed. >> he gave voice to millions of the disenfranchised latin america is back on home soil. after his violent killing in guatemala city last week, the argentine folk singer was returned or he will be mourned the most. they also have questions about how a musician once named the u.n. peace envoy could have been brutally murdered. >> we know there is an investigation about the person who drove the car. if anything more further from the ideals of time, it will be violence or anything related to the drug cartels. >> the a
, damaged by a phone hacking scandal, "news of the world," closes as of britain's best-selling newspaper after a run of over 100 years. >> certain individuals did not live up to the standards and qualities of journalism that we believe in. >> medical breakthroughs, for the first time scientists have been able to make an organ at of synthetic materials. will we have -- the end of an era is here for the space program. will mother nature cooperate? >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. it is the scandal which has stunned britain and today came the biggest bombshell of all. "news of the world," has been shut down. this has been in print since the 1800's. this comes after a public outcry. news corp. controls 40% of newspaper distribution in the u.k. and has a worldwide reach. >> this has been the famous newspaper in britain but the "news of the world," is being shut because it became famous for all the wrong reasons. this afternoon, the chairmen of news international announced that this sunday's edition will be the last and all revenues will go to good causes. it i
the word tabloid here in britain, and people think of "the news of the world." nothing would stop it in pursuit of a sensational headline. not human decency, not even breaking the law. >> we've always had in britain a vivid tabloid irreverent. but in the last two to three decades, that has descended beyond the gutter into the s sewer. and that happened at the same time as mr. rupert murdoch entered the market. mr. murdoch, in myy view, has debotched british public life. >> forgive the individual by all means. but you can't forget. >> reporter: that is media tycoon rupert murdoch. he bought the legendary london tabloid 42 years ago, and with it staggering profits, built a global media empire. in the u.s., murdoch owns fox news, "the wall street journal," "the new york post" and a lot more. he is even bigger here in britain, where he owns a major tv network and almost 40% of the newspapers sold, including "the news of the world." this week, that paper found itself at the center of a scandal so big, so rotten, that despite its massive profitable, it is being abruptly closed after 168
, news international closes britain's best-selling paper after a run of 168 years. >> clearly, practices of certain individuals did not live up to the standards and quality of journalism that we believe in and that i believe in. >> medical breakthroughs. for the first time, scientists have been able to make an organ out of synthetic materials. and will we have lived off? the end of an era is almost here for the -- lift off? the end of an era is almost here for the space program, but it all depends on mother nature. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. is the hacking scandal which has stunned britain, and it today came the biggest bombshell of all. britain's best-selling newspaper, the news of the world, has been shut down. it has been in print since the 1800's. the closure comes after a public outcry, but it has not lifted the spotlight from the murdoch empire which controls 40% of newspaper circulation in the u.k. and has worldwide reach. >> rupert murdoch, 1969, shortly after he bought a newspaper, "the news of the world," that was to become his very profitabl
>>> members of parliament in britain start getting their own back after the phone hacking scandal gets deeper all the time. hello, and welcome to the brussels studios of dw-tv and "european journal." also today, pollution problems for spain. the summer series about villages and communities, starting in poland. and macedonia's ethnic-divided young that unite to protest police brutality. >>> britain's tabloid press is notoriously aggressive about -- but "news of the world" top them all. the paper, britain's oldest sunday, has been closed down, but every day brings news of arrests at high-level resignations, including senior police officers, and it is shaking rupert murdoch's empire. every time paul traveled to england, the memories at king's cross station come flooding back. six years ago, a terrorist attack killed 26 people there. the 7/7 suicide bombings claimed 56 lives, and paul was one of the first helpers' on the scene. when he used a mask to protect a young woman whose face was badly burned, his picture made it into all of the papers. he was bombarded with calls from tabloid
and scheduled to depart by the end of this year. >>> britain's defunct "news of the world" tabloid it's reported may have hacked into the phones of 9/11 victims. "news of the world" reporters said they would pay him to get the private numbers of 9/11 victims, he declined. the last issue of the 168-year-old paper rolled off the presses yesterday, brought down by a growing hacking scandal. several staffers face jail time, meanwhile rupert murdoch the paper' owner is deep in damage control. elizabeth palmer reports. >> reporter: rupert murdoch arrived in london, conspicuously reading a copy of his notorious cameras, then smiled for the cameras as he went out for dinner with rebekah brooks his embattled ceo. the scandal has cost him one of his most profitable papers. staff leaving "news of the world" for the last time put a brave face on the murdoch decision to shut it down. the "news of the world" was the best selling newspaper in britain, a cheeky blend of skin, scandal and gotcha journalism, scarily aimed at british working people who enjoyed seeing the rich and the powerful taken down a peg or t
, "bbc world news." >> they are all agreed. britain's political party's united against news corporation as the hacking fallout grows, and could there be an american investigation. an american politician wants to know about the hacking scandal, if it's extended to 9/11 victims. >> and pro vin shall brother escapes from an explosion on his way to a funeral. >> and coming up on the program, plenty more dead fish in the sea. what europe is doing about its wasteful side to have fishing industry. and the latest winner of the euro lottery. how would you spend it? >> hello, the combined political weight of all three main hearts in britain will come down on the media organization news corporation today. a parliamentary debate rupert murdoch's takeover bid will be asked to be dismissed. it's due to unacceptable practices to gain information for stories including phone hacking. >> united against rupert murdoch. the conservatives and demonstrates have made a highly unusual decision to support this calling on him to withdraw his bid. >> it's in the public interest that rupert murdoch sees there's co
two front page side by side lengthy stories about something going on in britain. to do that otherwise, you would need the queen to abdicate and the plague to hit london. clearly there's a political agenda at work here. >> the testimony from the murdoches and the testimony from rebecca brooks, coverage as we said, both, here in the states and of course in the u.k. all the cable news networks on fox, on it in its entirety, no commercial breaks. do you think that the coverage was warranted, was it fair? >> was the coverage important in that it's the most important thing going on in the world, it's not. rupert murdoch and a lot of people have a lot of interest in it, yes. people want to see is this the thing that takes rupert murdoch down and you see this idea that somehow they're going to prove something that happened in this one isolated incident is actually happening everywhere else. that's what the coverage is really about, i think, is trying to blow it into something more than what it actually was. >> jon: jim, a lot of people out there would have loved to have seen some sort of a go
closes britain's best-selling paper after a run of 168 years. >> clearly, practices of certain individuals did not live up to the standards and quality of journalism that we believe in and that i believe in. >> medical breakthroughs. for the first time, scientists have been able to make an organ out of synthetic materials. and will we have lived off? the end of an era is almost here for the -- lift off? the end of an era is almost here for the space program, but it all depends on mother nature. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. is the hacking scandal which has stunned britain, and it today came the biggest bombshell of all. britain's best-selling newspaper, the news of the world, has been shut down. it has been in print since the 1800's. the closure comes after a public outcry, but it has not lifted the spotlight from the murdoch empire which controls 40% of newspaper circulation in the u.k. and has worldwide reach. >> rupert murdoch, 1969, shortly after he bought a newspaper, "the news of the world," that was to become his very profitable pride and
, notorious, "news of the world." known in britain as "news of the screws." it is the first time in a scandal that i have seen this inanimate object, this paper, punished. the people have not yet been punished, but the paper has, and the journalists are also the factor being punished. you can see immediately that this is not "the new york times ." it is flashy, full of enormously creative topography, and full of short-clad females. this is not the kind of thing that you see in "the washington post." when i was in newspapers, we used to do these mock issues. what if they had gone out and hit the loading dock? >> today, with the internet, that can happen. >> what were people looking for when they picked up this newspaper? >> much more of what we do in delivered a culture, it is a sort of envy, living vicariously. if i was only living in that said, went to those parties, dressed like that. "news of the world" started covering court cases. they did it in a very traditional, matter of fact way. the headlines were quite famous in their own right. you would pick this up knowing that you were getting
the role of first lady. >>> britain's newest royal couple, william and catherine are in california today, from ponies to celebrities, it promises to be a very busy day. >>> and the final shuttle has been launched into space. we will look ahead to what's next for nasa. >>> we begin this morning with the death of former first lady betty ford. she was 93 years old. ford was surrounded by family when she passed away last night. she became first lady back in 1974 when her husband gerald ford took over following the resignation of richard nixon. her greatest legacy may be the contribution she made against the battle against addiction. here what is president obama had to say about her passing. he says today we take comfort in the knowledge that betty and her husband former president gerald ford are together once more. michele and i send our thoughts and prayers to their children, michael, john, steven and susan. and this from flansy reagan. i was deeply saddened this afternoon when i heard of betty ford's death. she has been an inspiration to so many through her efforts to educate women about b
. after 168 years, the final edition of britain's news of the world hits newsstands today and bids farewell to its readers. this as the investigation into the paper's expanding phone hacking scandal continues. >>> hollywood royalty. william and kate take the polo ground by day and red carpet by night. all the details of their final star-studded night in america as we bid farewell to the future king and queen today sunday, we bid farewell to the future king and queen today sunday, june 10th, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good morning, everyone. welcome to "today" on a sunday. i'm lester holt. >> i'm jenna wolfe. not bad for a first trip to america. you got some polo, some red carpet, some celebrities, probably some free food, we should all be so lucky. >> probably got one of those great travel discount sites. >> i'm sure that is what it was. >> i hope they got some down time, though. southern california is a great place to just hang. >> they only had a couple days. there were a couple other states they visited. hopefully next time. >>> other news to get to
their fury at what happened. last week, let's remember, this was the biggest selling pap ner britain with an unrivaled reputation for journalistic scoop spots. the press itself fell silent this morning for the final time. and this is the last edition. so it has been a very long week on what we call fleet street here in britain. it's also been a very uncomfortable week for media boss rupert murdoch. >> reporter: for millions in britain, sunday morning involves a walk to the news agent to pick up "news of the world." a ritual their parents, grandparents, even great grandparents would recognize. but with thank you and good-bye, today is their last chance. the 168-year-old tabloid that thrived on scandal and exposie ing hypocrisy has itself been destroyed by a scandal of its own. the paper is being investigated for paying police for information and allegation of voice mail hacking. one paper has dubbed this britain's watergate. there is questions about standards in british journalism have been raised. three people have been arrested including the paper's former editor, once a key aide to
britain's corridors of power. brooks is answering police questions. >> reporter: in the cozy world of british politics and media, rebecca brooks was at its very center. she wined and dined the rich and powerful on behalf of her boss and mentor, rupert murdoch. brooks first came to news international as a secretary at "news of the world." she quickly developed a reputation for her tenacity as a journalist, reportedly once disguising herself as a cleaning lady to scoop a competitor. described as both ruthless and charming, she was soon the youngest editor of the "news of the world," and shortly after "the sun," both named by murdoch's news international. she spearheaded a controversial campaign to, quote, name and shame alleged pedophiles, publishing their names and addresses in the paper. as the editor of "the sun," brooks testified to parliament that her paper had paid police officers for information. and it was under her editorship that the "news of the world" allegedly paid a private investigator to hack into the voicemail messages of millie doweller, the 13-year-old girl murdere
him. we'll bring you more information when we have it. >>> britain's former prime minister gordon brown is the latest victim of phone hacking. the sun and sunday times improperly obtained personal information like bank and medical records on his family. two senior police officers will be grilled by a committee of mps why they didn't investigate phone hacking claims earlier. >>> u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton has criticized syria for failing to protect embassies after pro-government demonstrators broke windows and spray painted walls. no one managed to get into the building. >>> divers are still searching for victims of a deadly boat disaster. the boat was overloaded, not licensed to carry passengers when it sank on sunday. president dmitry medvedev ordered an investigation. >>> u.s. president barack obama is meeting with lawmakers for another round of debt talks on tuesday. the debate stalled over how to slash the deficit and raise the debt ceiling before the u.s. defaults. republicans want spending cuts but democrats support tax hikes and neither side wants to compromise
range. >>> there is new fallout from britain's phone scandal that is threatening rupert murdoch's media empire. murdock is in london trying to do some damage control. >> reporter: media mogul rupert murdoch faced a mob of reporters easy met with his embattled ceo, rebecca brooks, in london. british police will question her later this week about the phone hacking cover-up that happened on her watch. cameras caught murdock reading sunday's final edition of the news of the world. the paper ended a 168-year run after news broke that journalists were hacking the phones of murder and terrorism victims for stories. >> there will have to be some kind of massive, massive clearout of the stables really. it just looks terrible. >> reporter: london's "daily mirror" tabloid is hitting murdock with more claims of corruption involving 9-11 victims. the paper quotes an ex-new york city cop saying news of the world reporters offered to pay him for phone records of the dead. the phone hacking scandal boiled over last week with a case of milly dowler, a british team murdered in 2002. her parents met with
and raises more and more difficult questions for the police in britain. because originally the police said they looked into the allegations and said it was just a few isolated incidents and that there wasn't any need to investigate further and that now poses the question that either there was some kind of coverup at scotland yard or they just didn't think those allegations were serious enough to warrant investigation. and as we've now seen such as the phone a murdered school girl having had her phone hacked, this has really blown up. >> it's difficult for police, but how difficult is it now for politicians like the prime minister? >> it is difficult. all recent prime ministers have tried to keep on the right side of rupert merdock and news international, because they own about 40% of the british media. so they are very powerful. but many say that now has to change and there was a sense that proops for too long there had been too much deference for titles like news of the world and david cameron is vulnerable on this, because he has links to two former editors from news of the world. one w
if this is britain's watergate. a story that began with a few facts was pursued by a few journalists, now a scandal enveloping one of the world's most powerful men. >>> we'll show you how the royal couple spent the afternoon in southern california. we'll tell you just how much a ticket to have lunch cost with the two of them. >>> around the bay area, the ocean air c ditioning absolutely free. right now around the bay area, look at our temperatures in san francisco. it's chilly out there. you need a jacket even though it's july. 70s inland now, what you can expect for the rest of the weekend includes even cooler weather on the way. [ male announcer ] try sizzler's new value menu! malibu chicken, flame broiled steak, or half dozen jumbo shrimp, plus endless salad bar... starting at just $9.99! at sizzler. >>> after 168 years in president business, one of britain's newspapers is shutting down for good. rupert murdoch's news of the world is emt broiled in allegations of phone hacking that many see as not only illegal, but unforgivable. >> reporter: as the scandal that brought down one of his best selli
. they cracked the german code. >> there were some of the darkest days of the second world war, but britain's survival was in the balance. out in the a plan to, and -- in the atlantic on shipping convoys were bringing the supplies and munitions, but they were being sought by german submarines. it off heather's nottie germany threatening to win. this is blechly park. seven years ago, these were some of britain's most vital establishments. it was here that they broke the code of the german military. the most brilliant mathematician, crossword lynn was and others were brought together. -- crossword linguists and others were brought together. the british built this to help break the code. it was called colossus. it is generally considered to be the world's first computer. with its coats, which had taken the codebreakers six days to crack by hand, it could not happen in a matter of hours. >> we would have lost the war without it. is that important. >> 70 years after the code breakers worked in total secrecy, their work, which is -- which is said shortened the war by perhaps two years, received t
in britain, news corp. has made big business mistakes in america. it owns dow jones -- it bought at dow jones in 2007 and two years later it was worth $2.8 billion, less than their purchase price. myspace was bought for $580 million in 2005, sold for $35 million this year. but one of their largest shareholder still has huge confidence in the company. >> you have seen a business that has evolved, moving from newspapers and to other media, and moving more fee- based business model as opposed to advertising based. i think there is an awful lot of good steps that have been made, and i am very impressed overall with the company's success. >> rupert murdoch is back in america, more comfortable perhaps in a country where big investors still back him as the chief executive. >> here is a man, even though he is 80 years old, warren buffett is 80 years old and he is doing well, sumner redstone, and these are men with long track records of great success. to not want some of that wisdom in there, i think, would be a mistake. as will rogers said, good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes
for britain's sky broadcasting. this comes as a criminal investigation gets under way into the phone hacking a firestorm. back to the newsroom with developments in the story. >> it is being called britain's watergate, and since rupert murdoch has a major media presence in the u.s. and worldwide, the scandal is being closely watched here in washington. >> it started with a simple royal me injury for prince william, reported in 2005 by "news of the world." that leak led to a police investigation and charges the paper hacked into the house of windsor's phone lines, but it was not until this month that the british public learned from britain's "guardian" newspaper that politicians murder victims, and many others had also been have. today, after a meeting at 10 downing street, the family of a 13-year-old murder victim says they are glad the prime minister is now launching a full investigation. the family believes their daughter might be alive if the "news of the world" reporters deleted key messages from their families phone lines. >> politicians for all three parties have liaised and reacted so
to be suspicious suggesting it was a suicide. this scandal is rocking britain but seems ready to explode here in the united states. the fbi investigating whether a news corp journalist tried to hack into the phones of 9/11 victims and survivors. calls in congress for a investigation. the fbi also says it's aware of reports that actor jude law's phone was hacked while he was in new york. the scandal shows no sign of slowing down. quite the contrary. possibly being replaced as the ceo of his own media empire. a man whose customer base is the whole world. anyone who watches "glee" or reads the "wall street journal" or anyone that goes to the movies or reads books. we have jeffrey toobin and matthew chance. and brian stelter. brian, we'll start with you, rupert murdoch stepping down in the world of media, that's a wow. true or maybe? >> right now it's a maybe. news corp will not deny the bloomberg report on the record. what they say on background, people around the company say there was no meeting today to talk about it. you can tell that's not a real denial. they may want this out here before th
television in britain. the business consequences of this scandal are still unfolding, but the legal consequences started unfolding years ago. in 2007, a "news of the world" editor and private investigator hired by the paper were jailed for the phone hacking. the editor, andy coulson denied knowing about the hacking but resigned anyway. david cameron then hired that editor, andy coulson, to be a communications director for them. last week he and another editor were arrested for hacking and bribery charges. told about the involvement in the scandal at the time cameron was hiring him. cameron announced an official inquiry. >> after listening carefully, we've decided the best way to proceed is with one inquiry, but in two parts. i can tell the house this inquiry will be led by one of the most senior judges in this country and under the 2005 inquiries act. newspaper reporters, management, pro -- barbara boxer, jay rockefeller and bob menendez have all called for investigations by the justice department and securities and exchange commission. the senators say they want to know if american
>> welcome to our program. we begin with the prime minister of great britain, david cameron, answering questions in the house of commons. we have an assessment from lionel barber, the editor of the "financial times," and london bureau chief, catherine mayer. >> it came up in yesterday's hearing, and it's willful blindness. that is to say those people who should have known but didn't ask the right questions, for whatever motive. that is the question that mrs. brooks has to answer. >> we continue this evening with the incredible story of one of the richest women in china, zhang xin. >> from the outside, i hear friends talk about the rise of china, the politicians knowing what they do. in fact, someone mo who ves, works in china, a different picture. chinese are complaining about the government. the government seems to be rolling out of the policies, and managing the everyday problems. and in terms of theconfence ofecoming a superpower, i see -- i just don't see that. >> we conclude this evening with investigative reporter and author ahony somers. he's written a book called "th
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